My Favorite Danish Meat Balls

After posting my Danish Sour Cream-Dill Potato Salad the other day, I immediately knew the next recipe I wanted to share with you!

One of my family’s favorite dishes to pair with potatoes has to be Danish Meat Balls!

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Growing up, these meat balls were different than others — so extremely moist, tender and flavorful! When I was old enough to cook, this is one of the first dinner recipes I wanted to learn! They are one of my very favorites, and to my delight, my husband and daughters love them as well!

When I make them, my kitchen immediately smells like my grandparent’s or parent’s kitchen, and this makes me smile!

My Favorite Danish Meat Balls

*I prefer to use all organic ingredients

l pound ground beef

1/2 cup red onion, finely chopped

2 eggs

1 cup milk

2 pieces of dry bread, processed into fine crumbs

salt and pepper to taste

flour

extra-virgin olive oil

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-In a large bowl, combine all ingredients by hand or large spoon until well incorporated. I like to use a food processor to finely chop the onion and turn the bread into fine crumbs.

-In a small bowl, add approximately 2/3-3/4 cup flour to dip the meat balls.

-In a large pan or on a griddle, coat with olive oil and heat to medium-high.

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-Form into round meat balls or flat patties (about the size of a golf ball or slightly larger), and roll into the flour. The meat mixture will be extremely moist, so the flour is a tip from my Great-Uncle Rudger to help hold everything together! 😉

-Cook meat balls completely through until there is no pink left in the middle. I usually check one or two before I put all of them onto a plate. As you continue cooking, add more olive oil as needed to prevent sticking.

I highly recommend trying this wonderful dish with the potato salad recipe — they pair extremely well together and for me, always taste like “home sweet home”!

I hope you will enjoy!

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Danish Sour Cream-Dill Potato Salad

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This week I noticed something lovely — as I walked outside, I didn’t need a winter jacket! Not only that, I felt fine in a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt! Our temperatures have climbed into the 40 degree range, even inching into the 50’s, and it feels wonderful!

Ahh! Spring really is on it’s way! The chickens are overjoyed to see grass and sunbathe in sunshine, the bunnies are hopping for joy and Marcie has once again began venturing outdoors!

Of course, Jonathan, the girls and I are pretty excited, too! I’ve found myself beginning to daydream of spring/summer picnics and barbecues — which in turn got me daydreaming about a delicious family recipe — Danish Warm Potato Salad or as Grandma would call it, Varm Kartoffle Salat.

The official first day of spring isn’t until March 20th, but I simply couldn’t wait that long to share this with you! Warm, creamy and so delicious — this recipe is sure to inspire you of spring/summer gatherings as well!

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Danish Sour Cream-Dill Potato Salad

*I prefer to use all organic ingredients

16 small red potatoes

2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1/3-1/2 of a red onion, finely chopped

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. sugar

2 tsp. dill, or to taste

5 Tablespoons sour cream

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-Rinse potatoes well and cut into cubes. In a medium-size saucepan, cover potatoes with water, add a pinch of salt and boil for approximately 15 minutes or until tender.

-While potatoes are cooking, finely chop (by hand or in a food processor) 1/3 to 1/2 of a red onion. Saute onion in the olive oil until onion becomes soft — mix in salt and sugar.
-When potatoes have finished cooking, drain in a colander and pour back into the saucepan. Mix in onion mixture, dill and sour cream.
-Serve warm and enjoy!

Serves approximately 4-6 people

Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

GrandmaToday’s post is dedicated in loving memory of my wonderful grandma, Charla.

Born in Denmark, my Grandma immigrated to the United States with her family at the tender age of two. A wonderful wife, mother and grandmother, one of her greatest joys was cooking for family and friends. Family gatherings were often centered in my grandparent’s warm and inviting kitchen that overlooked their fragrant orange tree and a beautiful garden of daisies, one of my Grandma’s favorite flowers.

My Grandma was well-known for her many delicious dishes that included a variety of traditional Danish cuisine. Aebleskiver, or Danish pancake balls, were always a family favorite. This recipe comes from the cookbook, For Danish Appetites by Lyla G. Solum.

For this recipe, you will need to use an aebleskiver pan which is available at a variety of cooking stores or online.

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Danish Aebleskiver (Pancake Balls)

2 cups buttermilk

2 cups flour

2 eggs, separated

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

*1 teaspoon baking soda

2 tablespoons sugar

4 tablespoons melted butter

* the recipe calls for 1/2 teaspoon baking soda, but our family always used a full teaspoon, sometimes even 1 1/2 teaspoons

* I prefer to use all organic ingredients

-Separate the eggs and with a stand mixer, hand mixer or wire whisk, beat the egg whites until stiff.

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-With a wire whisk, combine all other ingredients until batter is smooth. Gently fold in egg whites.

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 -Over medium heat, put about one tablespoon of oil (I use coconut oil) in the bottom of each aebleskiver pan cup. When the oil becomes hot, put enough batter in each cup so that it barely comes to the top. Too much batter will make the aebleskiver difficult to turn.

-When you notice bubbles around the edge and towards the middle, it’s time to start turning the aebleskiver. Danish cooks would typically use a knitting needle to turn them, but a fork works well, too!

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-Continue to let the aebleskiver cook, turning often to prevent burning. When a toothpick comes out clean from the center, remove it immediately.

-Aebleskiver are traditionally served warm with jam or maple syrup and sprinkled with powdered sugar.

Enjoy, and as my Grandma used to say, “C’mon, you can eat one more!”

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A treasured photograph —

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